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. this is by the way his first visit to china either as president of the united states or as a private citizen. what the white house said is look if we are going to come to china, of course, we will come to beijing and have high level meetings there but we would also like to do an event in shanghai. it is undoubtedly the most western leaning of the cities in china. a go-go modern city. the commercial center of gravity throughout all of asia and the white house said we want to have something there a little less controlled and has a little less protocol and formality and have an event with some of the students in the overall shanghai region. the white house describes the students as the future leaders of china. the president wants to show them and the larger chinese community is that there can be give and take between the united states and china that is not so controlled. whether it is over human rights, economics, military strategy or a wide range of issues, global climate change would be another and that is one of the underlying motives for the white house in putting together the event, town hall, p
of the united states house of representatives. the united states senate, the senate majority leader, the speaker of the house, the honorable edward brooke, and the president of the united states. [applause] [applause] [applause] [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, majority leader of the united states senate, the honorable harry reid. [applause] >> everyone, please be seated. november 6, 1962, was a special day for president john kennedy. it was a day his brother ted won his old seat in the united states senate. the seat he would hold for the next 46 years, until just two months ago. a seat from which he would greatly improve the lives of his fellow americans. but on that election night, president kennedy took particular notice of another result from that same ballot in massachusetts. the people of the president's home state had elected edward brooke to be its attorney general, making him the first african-american to hold statewide office in massachusetts and the first african-american to serve as any state's attorney general. president john kennedy exclaimed, and i quote, "that's the biggest ne
in terms of moral absolutes with the united states being an absolute good. this contributes to the fourth issue, which is missing blowback. and fifth and finally, i don't think you talked about this as much, a belief that speedy change to political regime social security both desirable and possible. so i guess the question i have for you is if we follow's john's argument the cold war was a farce, does that invalidate these lessons? does it validate the lessons learned or mislearned? particular on the at the scream change, i realize it's a draft you mentioned in passing, i was quite interested to know in passing, you mention regime change as a possible outcome. in other words, you talk about it as being quite feasible tv a long-term commitment so. in other words, you talk about regime change as something that is quite possible to achieve, it just wasn't done properly recently. is that your view, and if so, how does one achieve regime change? and then the questions that came from on high via the internet ether is who would apply the same critique of faulty lessons to the bush 41 or clinton
liabilitys of the medicare and social security systems, the position of the united states verges on bankruptcy. because although we have a $10 trillion debt, the unfunded liabilities are $100 trillion. that's something that seems to me one can't likely dismiss. >> rose: a program note. we intended to show you this evening interviews with our friends malcolm glad well and job john grisham but because of the economic story, we will show you those interviews at a later time. tonight, orszag and ferguson when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: peter orszag is here, he is the director of the office of management and budget. called more than just the budget director by the "new yorker" magazine, he's deeply involved in president obama's ambitious domestic agenda as well. that includes health care, energy policy and entitlement reform. he's focus tong country's long-term fiscal health. the administration recently released projections showing deficits growing by $9 trillion over the next ten years. sp
of radicals. it indicates that radicalization of violence are taking place in the united states. one year ago, the department of homeland security issued a warning lead to an al qaeda plot against a railroad and commuter network. it linked to a new yorker who radicalized the violence around new york city before travelling to pakistan to seek out an opportunity to court is a paid in violent issue had -- violent jihad. four men were outside a community center in riverdale. they were radicalized in the united states. july 2009, seven men were arrested by authorities in north carolina. they possess weapons and 27,000 rounds of ammunition with plans to attack the marine base in virginia. they were inspired by al qaeda and radicalize in the united states. this past september, a man was arrested as part of an al qaeda conspiracy to attack locations in new york city with hydrogen peroxide based explosives. it was one of the most serious plot sense of 9/11. he lived in the united stated during his formative years before departing for pakistan. later that same september, a 21- year-old from new york's
people, including ethnic and religious minority, whether they are in the united states, china or any nation. >> but even as the president called for access to information, china was tightly controllg it. the meeting with a carefully screened group of students who were coached beforehand was not broadcast live across the country, and while it was available on two big national internet sites, it was hard to hear. and one big website, the xinhua news agency told people that the obamauñ÷ live, but then on the screen apparently fails to deliver on that promise. in tonight's "lead focus," we take an in depth look at the obama visit and its significance, beginning with the presidents day from melissa chan of al jazeera english. >> reporter: the president is now in beijing, but earlier in the day, he was in shanghai for his town hall meeting. it's the favorite format for the american president, a conversation with the people, talking about u.s./china relations. >> our world is now fundamentally interconnected. the jobs we do, the prosperity we build, the environment we protect, the securit
, military installation for the united states army. the biggest army installation in the world. every state, every territory from all over come and serve at fort hood, texas. and has been that way for a great number of years. my father, who served in the great world war ii, when he was an 18-year-old and did basic training in texas and came back home in 1945, was sent to fort hood, texas, to be reequipped for the invasion of japan -- re-equipped for the invasion of japan that never took place. but he met my mom there in temple, texas. he got married and that's why i was born in temple, texas, and have a great affection for that institution and all those that have served with the united states army at that location. it is now the deployment post for individuals who go overseas to represent the rest of us. they go to iraq. they go to afghanistan. they go to kosovo. they go all over the world. they are being deployed at this time to represent our country and the values that we have. and many of them have served multiple tours of duty. some of them up to four tours of duty in iraq. but yet they
of the united states verges on bankruptc because although we have a $10 trillion debt, the unfunded liabilities are $100 trillion. at's something that sms to me one c't likel dismiss. >> ros a program note. we iended to show you this eving interviews with our friends malcolm glad well and jojohn grism but because of theconomic story, w will show you those interviews at a later time. tonigh orszag and ferguson when we continue. captioningponsored by se communications om our studios in new york city, this is chlie rose. >> ros peter orszag is here, he ithe director of the oice ofanagement and budget. called more than just the budget rector by the "new yorker" magazine, he' deeply invved in psident obama's ambitious dostic agenda as well. that includes healt care, ener policy and entitlement reform. he's focus tong country's long-term fiscal healt the ministration rently released pjections showing defici growing by $9 trillio over the nex ten years. speaking at new york uversity earlier today, peter orszag sai the government is permitted to putting the cntry back on firm fiscal footi. i'm pleased
think the with the can make? >> i think the intent is first to show the united states is very serious about the energy and climate issue, number one. number two, copenhagen, as president rasmussen has said, since congress won't be able to address the energy and climate bill until after copenhagen that it's a framework for all countries -- let me say that he proposed you expect going in, a framework that will say this is our goal, this is going to be towards a lelie binding treaty. we're not going to get there in copenhagen but this is the step we need to take in order to get there. the good news is there's a lot of motion going on and i am encouraged that a lot of countries are beginning to say, considering where we were five years ago and beyond, things are looking very positive. >> mr. secretary, the white house on wednesday also announced that it would offer a 20/20 emissions cut proposal 17% below 2005 levels. and described this proposal as a provisional proposal, earlyly contingent on congress enacting this legislation. what happens if the congress doesn't enact legislation? >> w
who could go violent. we don't have that type of a threat in the united states. but we do have one. that's pretty of cour pretty p obvious. we have taken too heightly danger of the propaganda in the united states and the extent to which the mosques in the united states can reinforce these attitudes. so it's something that requires a lot more effort on the part of the bureau. >> paul: what are the triggering episodes that inspire a young muslim american to go over to al-qaeda? i'm thinking in particular of this recent somali episode, because it seems that some of them were radicalized if that is the right word by the invasion by ethiopia of somalia in 2007 that the united states supported. can it be one event like that? >> yes. there are many factors that come into play and there has been excellent studies looking at islamic militants, particularly those in europe. and you do tend to esee a pattern. first, there tends to be something deeply personal that strikes that believer and it r radicalizes him and makes him believe that the muslim community at large, what is almost a virtual
militants who could go violent. we don't have that type of a threat in the united states, but we do have one, i mean, that's pretty obvious and i think we have taken a little bit too lightly, the dangers of islamic militant propaganda in the united states. the extent to which mosques in the united states can reinforce that-- these attitudes. so, it is something that requires a lot more effort, i think, on the part of the bureau. >> what are the triggering episodes that inspire a young, young muslim americans to go over to al-qaeda? and i'm thinking in particular of this recent somali episode because it seems to some of them were radicalized, if that's the right word, by the invasion of ethiopia of somalia in 2007 which the united states supported. can it be just one event just like that? yes, i mean, there are many factors that obviously come into play and there have been some excellent studies looking islamic militants, particularly those affiliated in europe, and you do tend to see a pattern and that first of all, there tends to be, there's something deeply personal that strikes the believ
. but tonight, the question will be what our esteemed analysts think about the future of the united states as we stand here at the end of 2009. we really have an extraordinary group of panelists. let me just share their introduction so everyone knows who they are. i have learned that people like introductions. certainly, i like it louise gives me that wonderful introduction. we will first hear from richard haas, counsel for relations, who has worked with two presidents. as council president, he has truly been an entrepreneurial leader. it has always been important, but richard has he brought many scholars and expertise and wide range of subjects. his most recent book is called a " war of necessity, war of joyce," -- "war of necessity, war of choice." glenn hubbard is no ordinary academic. he is dean of columbia business and a tenured professor of finance and economics at the columbia school of arts and sciences. he has worked for the treasury and as a consultant to the federal reserve bank, and recently he wrote a book called "healthy, wealthy, and wise -- five steps to better health care system
trial in the history of the united states. that's my conclusion after studying it as close as i could. and that's the report of my book. i try to explain in my book why i believe that to be true, and i will try to give you a suggestion on what i believe that to be true in my remarks here tonight. john brown's trial was the first trial in the history of the united states to receive massive attention from national media. it was the first trial in which a defendant was executed for treason against a state, as opposed to treason against the united states. it was the first trial in which an accused defendant appealed to a higher law to justify violent crimes. it was a trial that involved more than just a determination of an individuals guilt or innocence, according to laws laid down in statute books and in case reports. it was a trial that pitted two starkly different moral visions against each other. one of these visions defended the institution of chattel slavery as traditional, necessary, just and worthy of protection from outside interference. particularly, from the outside interferenc
interact with the rest of the taxode heren the united states. anwe don't have a value-added tax. so,gain, i don... again, it's been dcussed in academic circles. i ha not heard serious policy diussion of it en coming from citol hill. so it seems likeore of an academic idea at thi point tn an idea that's directlyn the mix in terms of policy. >> rose: what's going to be the biggest contributoto dicit reduction? >> well, over the long term i thk we need to be ver clear that it is not possible t tax your way out of the fcal trajectory that we're on. and further more,it's not possible to reduce spending outside of health care sufficientlyo addressur.... >> re: that means defse d... >> rht. our longerm fiscal problem is dispportionately influenced by the rate at which heah care costs grow. >> rose: right. >> over th next five or ten years, the sittion is a little bit different and the mixmay vary. buover the next 20, 30, 40, 70 100 years, the key thing is lping to reducehe rate of growth in health ce cts. wiout that, notng elsee do will matr. >> ros and so the bill is that's goi to come out of the
emigrating to the united states. it was a great magnet for talent for canada. i came and went to graduate school in the united states. ended up owing $500 to my law school and i had like a -year-old chevrolet and had a wonderful experience in this country. it is open in many ways, that are so unique to this country and to this culture and it was pacific northwestly clear to me why anybody with energy and talent would want to move here, because of the opportunities that were created not just in terms of economic opportunities but just in general. -- perfectly clear to me why anybody with energy and would want want to move here. it was much less -- there is much less prejudice in this society. merit and talent was a much more important quotient but have i to say that despite all of this experience that would have and has made me very optimistic on so many levels, i have developed an increasing sense of pessimism about where we are going in the future. future. . re ng in the future. the main reason for that, frankly, is the propensity of the american system now to produce weekly -- leadershi
and gentlemen, the president of the united states. >> ladies and gentlemen, please remain standing for the procession of our nation's colors and those of our veterans service organizations and the united states air force concert band plays the -- plays the "national emblem march". ♪ ♪ ♪ [the "national emblem march" playing] ♪ >> please remain standing for the prayer for all veterans delivered by chaplain keith etheridge, director of the department of veterans affairs chaplain service. >> please join me in prayer. eternal god, another year has passed and once again we get there before you in this sacred amphitheater to pray and honor american veterans. as we gather here, we see new faces of family members still grieving the loss of loved ones who have made the ultimate sacrifice for the cause of freedom. we pray for them and for all veterans and their families who gather in ceremonies large and small at this hour to honor the living and the dead who have served in our armed forces. we especially pray for our soldiers set fort hood and for their families -- bless our veterans
. the prime minister yesterday visited a joint united states/israeli missile defense maneuver. there th're preparing for all eventualities. rocket and missile attacks on israel from iran, syria are lebanon and gaza. >> the threat is new and the fact is our forces are being prepared to give a new response. >> the new response is the iron dome anti-missile system. it will be deployed in less than a year. but the fact that remains is from now on, in any future israeli conflict, from the north or the south, the heart of the nation tel aviv will be under threat. >>> today in milan, italy, there >>> today in milan, italy, there was a landmark court ruling regarding a program run by the central intelligence agency known as extraordinary renditn. under that program, terror suspects were secretly detained and flowto foreign countries for interrogations that some have described as torture. today an italian judge convicted 23 americans of kidnapping an egyptian cleric from a milan street in 2003 in one such operation. the cia has declined to comment on the case and all of the americans were tried
this was an utter, unmitigated disaster for the security of the united states and for the interest of the united states in the dangerous world we live in. the sanctimonious comments by general holder today are this, self-serving and self-centered. we ought to be concerned of what is in the interest of the united states of america. you nailed it absolutely right. what good is there to be gained by trying these mass murderers, war criminals in civilian courts with rules designed for conventional crimes committed by conventional criminals as general mukazie once said. they'll challenge the way they were treated and what about the chain of evidence and did we have all the constitutional nicities in a war? they're going to proclaim outrageous treatment and lie about it because they've got the world stage and this will serve to recruit additional jihaddists because they're going to attack america throughout this entire episode, the sorry episode and they're going to try and get support throughout the muslim world for their cause by ex-core eighting -- excoriating the united states of america and our v
the united states and cuba. a key congressional committee is discussing lifting the ban on americans traveling to cuba. could the embargo fall next? we talk to the committee chairman and to a leading human rights advocate with a scathing report on cuba. plus, differing viewpoints from two officials who have just returned from there. >>> but first, cnn's nick robinson reports on the new robotic warfare over afghanistan and pakistan. it's conducted from thousands of miles away in suburban america. >> reporter: look around this room. it's been hit by a missile fired from an unmanned aerial vehicle, a uav, more commonly known as a drone. the family living here say children were killed in this u.s. attack. the children were never the target, but in pakistan's tribal border region, the death spelled trouble for u.s. foreign policy. where many believe that fighting with drones is cowardly. >> last year, one of the most popular songs in pakistani pop culture was a song whose lyrics talked about how america fights without honor. >> reporter: launched from just over the border in afghanistan,
is the united states refining its anti-piracy strategy. the coast guard is bringing apprehended pirates to justice. how to fend off attacks. commander shannon gilrees, chief of prevention log group. commander, welcome to the show. >> thank you, sir. >> so how is the united states refining its anti-piracy campaign. >> we'll continue to adapt to what the pirates are throwing at us as far as their techniques. we are working with the maritime industry to try to answer their questions about how we can help them address the problems in the region. we're also working with interagency -- agency by that i mean the department of defense, department of state, the maritime administration, other agencies -- >> the justice department as well? >> the justice department as well. we're working to refine that policy to adapt the policies the pirates are using. >> prosecuting captured pirates has been a challenge. you can't drop them off in somalia for trial, for example. what is going on in that front in terms of cooperation the united states is striking with other country in the region to bring these gu
. that is what happened in the united states and what is happening in europe and what is happening in asia. i think at one time we could have another bubble and as bubble is going to be bigger from the other. the united states, now the cost of financing their debt is about $50 billion a year. looking at $900 billion in 2020. obviously the problem of that accelerating and putting investors at risk. in dubai we have a big bubble and i think abu dhabi has to put the burden of correcting a miscalculation. >> professor, what do you think is abu dhabi's position. it is not entirely clear whether they will underwrite the whole thing or pick and choose which of the debts they are going to deal with. >> obviously -- they say they cannot -- they probablyavto put first of all a new regulation a new role and they have to tighten the belt. they cannot just bail out and then go into another problem. but so far, the central banker of dubai -- liquidity, but they said they have to pick and choose. they don't have to reschedule all of that but they have to schedule some of that. this is going to be a new equa
and india and the rest of east asia and these companies can be located in the united states, europe, japan. anywhere. you got to look at it company by company to try to latch on to some of this growth we're seeing coming out of asia. >> let me talk about the united states, the market has soared about 60% since march. really which was the bottom, of course. now hitting 13 month highs this week alone. do you think there's still room to go up? if i wanted to enter this market, put new capital to work right now is that worthwhile or have i missed. >> it's >> you haven't missed it at all. what people don't realize is how much the market pell in point terms and between october 9th of 2007 and march 9th of 2009 the s&p 500 fell by 888 points. we still regained less than half of those points lost. so there's still more money on the table than we've gotten back so far. so i know people would have liked to have gotten in hard. even if they didn't there's still opportunity for good gains in stocks in the united states over the next few years. >> what about the large sort of structural issues the u.s.
is to understand the circumstances that are going on right now in terms of the compromise of the united states sovereignty by what's happening to the dollar with deficits budget to be positive so the last third of this book is solutions. what we can do as a subtitle says fighting new world order, surviving the global depression and preserving u.s. sovereignty. so the themes of this book at the last third or to give solutions and call to action for how we can organize our lives, how we can organize politically in order to fight back to say no to a global new deal. now, to get everyone's mind of around the idea of america for sale, i like to start at this way. we currently have page 24 of the book and document we have got about a 65.5 trillion what the t negative net worth. now what that means, that is according to the department treasury's own statistics. once a year the deeper and the treasury does a gap accounting and david walker, who was the head of the government accountability office actually resigned in 2008 it went on the week up to our alarming people, telling people essentially that i
and representatives. there are more women serving at any time. there are 17 women serving in the united states senate and 74 women serving in the united states house of representatives. of those congresswomen currently serving, 14 are currently members of the c.b.c. since the first representative of color, patsy minching of hawaii won election in 1964, a total 39 women of color have served. 30 of these women were elected after 1990. and a total of 38 have served in the house of representatives where carol mostly brown of illinois is the only women to serve from 1993 to 1999. the first african-american was sharle chisholm. and there are some states who have never elected a woman to congress, delaware, iowa, mississippi and vermont and i look forward to having women from those states join us at some point, madam speaker. there are historic number of women currently serving in congress, including the first woman speaker of the house, nancy pelosi, who was elected speaker in 2007. the 111th congress understands that our nation's laws must include and respond to all our citizens, including women. women in
how the united states may change this influence, address this national security deficiencies him and provide global leadership in an era when the american economy may not be the overwhelming source of power it once was. increasingly, national influence will be determined by whether the countries can contribute to solving global problems or at lease whether they are making themselves indispensable to other nations. china and other developing economies are demanding a greater say in the management of the world economy through the g20 and other mechanisms. china's global leverage has increased as it liberally positioned itself as a creditor nation with more than 20% of the world current account balance surplus. we cannot depend invasively on china investing heavily in the united states government that. some thought must be given to how we work with china and other nations to establish a more sensible global balance that depends less on demand by american consumers. the united states in the g20 also must rethink the role of the international financial institutions that provide crisis
chance to mention just exactly what we do in the united states that t china. in the-- the minut& >> bill planning with the pres thank you very much. now here's maggie.-- >>> a drug. millions take zetia by merck, but renewing questions about whether it our dr. jennifer ashton is here with go y- this at length this morning b- becauecause so many people do take this this journ 200& for 14 months. som- others were taking an over the counter vitamin. wh >> had cardiovascular risk factors or t attack - they were already on a stat & - pconcont
that the future of the united states and asia is inextricably linked. >> president obama is in asia threw next week with stops in tokyo, singapore, shanghai, beijing. so who get as the lion's share of obama's time? china. three days out of nine replicating what happened recently at the u.n. where the president of china and president obama were closeted for 90 minutes. this time allocation speaks for itself. and if there is any doubt remaining, obama's description of the u.s./chinese relationship clears it up. >> the relationship between the united states and china will shape the 21st century, which makes it as important bilateral relationship in the world. >> question. what must president obama accomplish in china this coming week? pat? >> he'll have to rebalance the trade relationship between the united states and china. the last ten years, the chinese have had a $2 trillion surplus. we've experted to them jobs, factories, money, technology, and that's one of the reasons why we've got this financial crisis and the dollar's in such trouble. what he's got to do is convince the chinese that this
of the world is, the united states and through president obama to announce our intentions and our way forward. but they have a deep understanding of why this is important for nato, why this is important for the larger international community. and i think that given the right measures of accountability that we need to be seeking from president karzai and his government, we're going to see a commitment not just from germany but from many of our nato allies. >> rose: might they make up whatever the gap is between what general mcchrystal is seeking and what the united states is prepared to provide in terms of troops? >> well, i think we have to wait for the president's announcement. but we will be, as we have been, consulting very deeply our allies and talking about what we want to see from them in order to have this integrated military and civilian strategy. because, remember it's not just about troops on the ground, it's about making sure that the people of afghanistan see the results of this effort. that they have more faith in their own government as of... as an entity that can deliver for th
chief for "alternate." will also talk with a guest about the united states effort to resolve longstanding difference between israelis and palestinians. also note tim brown of the 9/11 network coalition. he will be here to talk was about the december 5 rally in new york against bernanke 9/11 suspects to a federal courthouse in lower manhattan. . . american icons, continues tonight at 8:00 p.m., with the history, art and architecture of the most symbolic structures, tonight at 8:00 p.m. on c-span and get your own copy of american icons, a three-disk set, $24.95. order on-line at c-span.org/store. now a look back at cuban missile crisis, with kennedy advisors ted sornson and carol kasem. from the kennedy library in boston, this is an hour and 15 minutes. this war policy was done in secret and steps were taken to deceive us by every means they could. they were planning in november to open to the world the fact that they had these missiles so close to the united states, not that they are with intending to fire them, because if they were going to get into a niewg clear struggle, th
moved back to the united states when i was a baby and lived there till i was five in rochester, new york. this was after it had become safe for war resisters. my father worked in a health clinic in the state, and my mother worked at a cable access channel. they both decided they preferred it in canada. my father preferred the single payer health care system. my father preferred that. my mother was working for the national film board, which is a public institution that allowed her to make the political films that she wanted to make. they left the u.s. because of stayed in canada because of the social programs. >> do you remember when you first learned of this story and it sunk in? >> in canada, you did not have to be rich to get sick. i feel i always knew the story about health care. this was explained to me as a kid. i did understand that it was unfair that people were denied access to medicine because they did not have money to pay. as a doctor, my father preferred to work in a system whereby money did not have anything to do with the care that you received. i feel like i have always k
're unique here in the united states of america. madam speaker, we're a unique people and, yes, we are the progeny of western europe and we're the progeny that came from primarily western european stock and at the time that we received the best that western europe had to offer, we also received a fundamental christian faith as the core of our moral values. and this is a judeo-christian nation, madam speaker. the core of our moral values is embodied within the culture. whether people of whatever church people go to or whether they go to church, wherever they worship or whether they worship, we still have the american people as a culture who understand christian values and christian principles, the judeo-christian values that are timeless. and so i would illustrate that, madam speaker, in this way. that when -- an example would be this, let's just say if an honorable man from texas were to pull into his driveway and his neighbor's dog had gotten loose and ran underneath the tire of his car and if he killed -- if you're in texas or iowa or most of the places in the country, if you run
. one country's success need not co at the expense of another. that is why the united states insists we do not seek to contn china's rise. on the contrary, we welcome ina as a stron and prosperous and sucssful member o the community of nations. >> reporter: answering a qution on internet access ina -- >> unrestcted internet access a source ofrength, and i thinshould be encouraged. i think that the morereely formation flows, the stronger the society beces because tn citizens of countries around the world can hold their own governmes accountable. ey can begin tohink for themselves that generates new ideas. >> reporter: and disssing cooperation on climate change -- >> the united stat and china are th world's two larst emitters of greenhous ges, of carbon that is causing the planet to warm. so unls both of ou countries are willg to take critical steps in dealing with this issue, we wil not be able to resolve it. >> reporter: there's no down china d the u.s. wil be v to workogether on a variety of world problems, but don't expect any major announcements fro this visit. after shangi, the pres
billion or $40 billion of tax revenues and also bring in about $750 billion of cash into the united states. >> how do they do it? >> it's really simple. by what i would call enlightened taxation. right now foreign profits to bring back into the united states have you to pay a 35% tax on it. by implementing a reduced tax, the way it was done in 2004, all that -- all those foreign earnings will come streaming back into the united states. it's estimated to be $750 billion that's outside the united states. corporations don't have to bring it in, but they made -- when they bring it in, it's taxed. by reducing the tax, it encourages those profits to come back, and by doing that, that $750 billion will be spent here in the united states. right now multi-national corporations are cash rich off shore and are cash poor domestically, so when they have to build a research plant, a research facility, where do you think they're building? they build it where the cash is because they can't get it back here into the united states. >> to doubt you bring some of these issues up at the new york fed. you are d
, the answer is i would probably start with something different from what we have in the united states. there is a wonderful book out there called "the healing of america," by a washington post reporter. what we have in the united states is an amalgam of the worst, that just about all of the system that you talked about, we have a little bit from this one, a little bit bad from this one, etc. so you end up with something that cims it is the best health care in the world when the statistics say it is pretty pathetic, the quality of health care and united states. >> you are saying the medicine is pathetic, so what about care? >> the medicine is pathetic, the results are pathetic. and the costs are exorbitant. >> that is very depressing. >> what happens then is that it gets demagogued to death. that is what we're seeing right now. the old things that scare people into tea parties, and from the left, things that are unrealistic. you end up in the same state of political paralysis, and the united states gets into deeper trouble providing something that should be a fundamental right in this
, john, because i don't think it will get through the united states senate. there's a reason for that, john. al gore's moment has come and gone. the truth is, they are changing the nile to climate change rather than global warming for a reason. for ten years, the earth has been cooling. 1998 or so was the hottest year. the polar bear population is doing fine. antarctica is growing, the ice cap is growing. the arctic ice cap has stopped shrinking. you look around the united states, you are having record cold trends. you have this tremendous real problem in the american economy as opposed toed mythical problem of global warming. for these reasons, john, i think it's not going to get through the senate. i think, as i say, al gore's moment has passed. this whole thing was a bit of a hoax designed to transfer power from individuals and wealth to governments and from governments to transnational, international corporations, global institutions. that time has come, and it has gone. >> eleanor? >> that was both a minority view and paranormic view that it's all a conspiracy to transfer power.
's meetg, "the new york tis" noted e range of issues on whic the united state was asking for china's help. somethinthat might have been thinkable, it sa,efore the united states became embroiled in two wars a bfore the u. onomy was hbbled bythe global financialrisis that began on ishores. those issu inclu the wde trade ga between the two countries, redung greenhouse gas emiions, as well as iran and its nuclear program. prident obama alsobrgh up with the dai lama,he a exiled leader of tibet. beyond a show of goodill and a prome to work o big issues, no breakthrous were reported. but in tonight's "leadfocus," we wt to show you how the issue was cvered by theenglish language cnnel of chinese ate television. >> reporter: presint hu jintao has met with barack obama in beijing. they haveledged fortronger cooperion and to findore mm ground deite their differces. their discusons also focused on global challengesndhe wod economy has a solid recove. >> ts is the third formal meetingetween pesident ji andao barack obama this year th the interests of e world'sargesteveloping and develed nations. the t
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